Eurovisionary

Eurovisionary
28
March
2020

Eurovision stays home with Ryan O’Shaughnessy and others

Eurovision stays home with Ryan O’Shaughnessy and others

Ryan O'Shaughnessy

Last week came the news that many Eurovision fans were dreading, as the ongoing threat from the novel virus COVID-19 brings unprecedented devastation to populations across the world, the 65 year old song contest has for the first time in it’s history been cancelled.

It is a tough time for people that invest a lot of energy into their hobbies and past times. Since the announcement of Eurovision 2020’s cancellation, other major events have been halted by the spread of the virus. Only days ago sporting fans saw the I.O.C. declare the games of the 32nd Olympiad in Japan postponed until 2021,  theatre enthusiasts have seen the 74th Tony Awards postponed until mid-April (optimistically) and Glastonbury being rescheduled to June 2021.

As much as we are disheartened by the decision taken by the EBU, it is without doubt the correct decision for all those who work on the show and who travel from across the world to enjoy the event annually.  Yet the EBU should be applauded for maintaining a positive outlook on the future of the contest.  Already they have honoured all the artists chosen for 2020 by reassuring them that the release of the always anticipated compilation CD will go ahead, as well as officially announcing that 10 of the 2020 artist have so far been asked back to next year’s contest by their respective broadcasters.

See alsoSan Marino: Director-General releases statement about Eurovision's cancellation

May 2021 seems a long way off, as we are still in March of 2020, yet there is simply nothing we can do but keep our spirits up.  Many on social media are continuing with their own personal contests with followers in different groups and pages on facebook and instagram creating polls for each semi final and having a Grand Final to choose their winner.  This year all 41 songs are winners as they worked hard to bring us a great show and through no fault of their own will not be able to showcase those great entries with the world on such a vast stage as Eurovision’s.

All this being said, the EBU have stepped in to help fans through this longer than anticipated Eurovision Blues period.

Starting next Friday, 3rd April on the official Eurovision Song Contest YouTube page, will be Eurovision Home Concerts, a weekly show which will see some of our favourite past Eurovision contestants along with 2020 entrants perform some classic eurovision songs and their own contest hit and this year’s entrants will get their first opportunity to share their talents to the whole of Europe since the cancellation announcement.

While you #StayAtHome, we have something exciting coming to our YouTube Channel every Friday!🥳

YOU can choose the #Eurovision songs your favourite artists will cover from THEIR homes!📲

👉 https://t.co/ua6pWNOvHz#EurovisionHomeConcertspic.twitter.com/Q7l4zUq17B

— Eurovision Song Contest (@Eurovision) March 27, 2020

This will be an interactive experience with the public getting the opportunity to choose which song each artist covers, from an option of four songs chosen by the artist directly.

The first episode will feature multiple artists, 2018 Irish entrant Ryan O’Shaughnessy is the first to be announced he will sing one of these four songs and you can vote on which one you want to see him sing:

Which ONE of his four choices do YOU want to hear him cover?🎙️

The poll will close tonight at 22.00 CET🕙@Ryan_Acoustic | #EurovisionHomeConcerts | #Eurovision

— Eurovision Song Contest (@Eurovision) March 27, 2020

More artists will be announced in due course, but it will be a great way to bring fans together as they come to terms with the loss of their’s and Europe’s favourite TV show.

From all of the EuroVisionary team, we want to wish you well and hope you stay safe and stay home, if that is possible.

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23
March
2020

Video: Fans celebrating 45 years since Turkish Eurovision debut

Video: Fans celebrating 45 years since Turkish Eurovision debut

Turkish fans + OGAE Turkey logo

Yesterday saw the 45th anniversary of Turkey’s debut at the Eurovision Song Contest. A group of OGAE Turkey members celebrated it by singing their country’s debut song “Seninle Bir Dakika” from their homes.

People all over the world are staying at home to stay safe and protect others from the Coronavirus’ COVID-19 disease. This is no exception in Turkey who have so far registered 30 deaths. The situation brings alternatives to spend good and effective time at home.

The cancellation of Eurovision 2020 also caused sadness among fans in Turkey. Even though the country has not  participated since 2012, there are many fans who still follow the contest closely. Many of them are members in the fan club OGAE Turkey.

As a result of staying at home, but still mark this 45th anniversary of the first Turkish participation, a group of Turkish fans recorded a video of them singing Seninle Bir Dakika, the country’s first ever Eurovision entry.

In the embedded video below, take a look at what they Turkish fans produced:

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21
March
2020

Ireland: Fifty years ago today Dana won Eurovision with All Kinds Of Everything

Ireland: Fifty years ago today Dana won Eurovision with All Kinds Of Everything

Dana

Today we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first Irish win at Eurovision, when Dana took the title with the song All Kinds Of Everything. Some may say she saved the future of Eurovision.

Way back in 1970, the Eurovision organisers had a problem on how to decide where to host the 15th Eurovision Contest. The previous year, four countries drew for first place when it had been hosted in Madrid, Spain. To avoid Spain having to host the following year, they were eliminated as potential hosts, as was The United Kingdom as they had hosted in 1968.

That left a choice between France and The Netherlands, with Amsterdam eventually being chosen as the host city.

One problem solved, the next one came when Portugal, Sweden, Finland and Norway decided they did not want to participate due to the shambolic four way tie the previous year, with Austria also deciding to give it a miss.

So in 1970 the future of the contest looked bleak, when only twelve countries agreed to participate and it seemed a given that Knock Knock Who’s There, the United Kingdom’s entry by Mary Hopkin was going to win.

However, a little 18 year old from Derry, Northern Ireland had different plans when she entered the stage to sit on her little box. Dana, real name, Rosemary Brown, gave an instantly appealing performance of a Derry Lindsay and Jackie Smith song, All Kinds Of Everything. Before the voting had even started it seemed that she was the obvious winner, and when Belgium awarded the song 9 of its 10 points, the win was secured.

Eurovision organisers were delighted to have such a popular winner, and the song became an international best seller, knocking Simon and Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water from the top of the charts in the United Kingdom. Interest in the contest was revived again, and the missing countries returned the following year.

Dana went on to have a very successful career with hits including Please Tell Him That I Said Hello, Fairytale and Its Going To Be A Cold Cold Christmas.  She even entered politics and tried to become the Irish president. Eventually Ireland would rack up seven wins, a record they have held since 1996.

Mary Hopkin finished second, while a newcomer from Spain placed 4th. That newcomer, Julio Iglesias eventually became a global superstar, a feat repeated by his son Enrique.

For now though, let’s celebrate Dana’s 50th anniversary win, as All Kinds Of Everything Reminds Me Of You.

This reflection article is based on the author's ownpersonal experience. Views expressed belongs to him or her, and are to be seen as unrelated to EuroVisionary.com.

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20
March
2020

EBU: We will honour the 2020 songs, but they can’t participate in 2021

EBU: We will honour the 2020 songs, but they can’t participate in 2021

Anton Boo from Little Big (Russia 2020, Drawing)

It’s decided; all songs selected for the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest will not be eligible for it’s replacement in 2021. The EBU however does intend to honour the songs in some way of form with an alternative show, and their online platforms.

Half a week ago, another aspect of the lives of Eurovision fans and TV viewers was suddenly altered. Following the decisions made by other large events, such as the UEFA European Championship, the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest was cancelled due to the risks and restrictions imposed because of the COVID-19 outbreak. Ever since that announcement, a main point of discussion among fans was what would happen to the 41 songs.

The EBU is now able to provide a, partial, answer to that burning question: As the rules of the Contest clearly state that a song must not be released before September 1st of the previous year, the 2021 Eurovision Song Contest will not be open for the songs selected for the cancelled Eurovision. No exception will be made due to the exceptional circumstances.

As the Contest has no rules preventing well known artists, or artists who have previously participated, to take part any selected artist could in principle be welcome next year. It’s up to each individual country to decide of they will select a new artist, or will have their previously selected artist take part with a new song.

See alsoCoronavirus: It's official – Eurovision 2020 cancelled

The EBU does, however, intend to honour the songs and artists who were supposed compete and make their nation proud on the 12th, 14th and 16th of May 2020 in Rotterdam. It’s still in it’s early stages, so they cannot share any details just yet, but they will come with some kind of programming later this year. They do emphasise that this will not be a competition format.

The songs will also be honoured through Eurovision’s online platforms.

We ask for your patience while we work through ideas in the coming days and weeks.

– @Eurovision, on Instagram

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19
March
2020

Eurovision 2020 cancelled – We are mourning

Eurovision 2020 cancelled – We are mourning

Yesterday, we all faced the shock that the 2020 contest were cancelled. All hope was out, and we were left with an empty sad feeling. Coronavirus had taken another victim dear to us away.

For a few weeks, it has been clear that the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest couldn’t take place as scheduled. Different possible scenarios kept playing in our head – up until tomorrow afternoon when the contest was cancelled.

We, fans of the Eurovision Song Contest, live like most others in Europe at the moment in more or less complete isolation. Our countries are shut down, schools closed, and those of us working, mainly do it from home.

EuroVisionary mourns

Our team of writers are spread all over Europe and represents various age groups too. We asked them to write a little piece about how they feel now, having had time to digest the news of the cancellation.

Josef, Czech Republic

🇨🇿 We all somewhere deep inside knew this may come one day, taking the current situation into account. But it is something none of us wanted to happen, never. Laying for some hours and doing nothing, but listening to Eurovision 2020 songs is how we can get over this depression. It is not the usual P.E.D – Post Eurovision Depression. It is just depression. There will be no Eurovision, so it is actually Anti Eurovision Depression, if you can call it that.

Let’s not forget those 41 artists and their songs, no matter if we liked them or not. They deserve the attention. Let’s pay them back what they gave us until now. 💔

🇩🇰 Charlotte, Denmark

I am still in shock. I was hoping for, and expecting, a decision to broadcast the contest with every act performing in their own country – maybe with a month or two delayed. That way we would still have a Eurovision – and in times of unrest and anxiety like now, I think that would have been the best option.

In a few months, we as nations will have fought through this coronavirus. There will be a bill to pay. Emotionally as we’ll have lost loved ones. Economically too as shutting down our countries isn’t cheap, and we’ll more than ever need Eurovision to cheer us up: A TV show we love and hate at the same time. We’ll need to talk about worst dressed act, bad jokes from the hosts and we need a winning song, we can discuss for hours and hours… Until we start speculations on which city should host 2021 and whether or not the country can handle it. Unfortunately, now we’ll have non of the above. We all lost our freedom and our social life is completely shattered. Some lost family and dear friends, and others their job. We had to cancel big personal events in our lives. We were robbed of big sports events, and now we also lost Eurovision to coronavirus 😥

See alsoEurovision 2020 cancelled – What will happen to the selected songs?

🇬🇧 Ashleigh, United Kingdom

The news has come as an extra disappointment to me as after being a long time fan, Eurovision 2020 would have been my first time being at the contest. It is also a great pity for the artists who have worked hard to win their respective selection processes and promote their songs.

I hope they will get the chance represent their country next year, and that Eurovision 2021 will be better than ever.

🇳🇱 Wouter, the Netherlands

When I heard the news that Dansk Melodi Grand Prix was to be held without audience, my first thought after the initial shock was that this was only the beginning. Something was going to change about the 2020 Eurovision Song Contest, we just had to wait for the what, when, and how. With tougher restrictions being added across Europe every day, the decision to cancel become more and more inevitable. And yet I’ve been denying it to myself, thinking all will be ok if we just give it some more time.

But then it all became all too real, all of a sudden. Like a blow in your face. I had been looking forward to experiencing the Eurovision Song Contest in my motherland, and some stupid, invisible, new, unexpected threat has taken that and so much more away from me. I guess what I’m trying to say is: this sucks, big time!

🇬🇧 Theo, United Kingdom

Even though May 2021 feels an awfully long time away to wait for the next edition of Eurovision, this was ultimately the right decision. I also secretly hope that we end up with an improved crop of songs for 2021 as, regrettably, I was not ecstatic with many of the songs for this year.

See alsoSan Marino: Director-General releases statement about Eurovision's cancellation

🇬🇧 Michael, United Kingdom

As a fan I am disappointed that Eurovision has been cancelled. I also feel sorry for all the acts who have worked so hard, and also appalled at the early dismissal of the mamas and Uku for 2021. Part of me is kind of glad it’s been cancelled due to outrageous prices accommodation etc would have been in Rotterdam, but now they’ll go up even more next year due to more people wanting to go after a two year break.

But this is a competition we all love so of course it’s a shame it’s had to be cancelled. I know there’s worse problems in the world but it’s something we like and didn’t want cancelled. It will hit more in May, but I want this suffering from this virus to end. Let’s hope we all get the results governments are hoping for and this virus is banished. Affordable prices next year would be an added bonus as compensation to all the fans who’ve missed out this year, but that probably won’t happen.

To our readers

Keep safe everyone, follow the guidelines about social distance and remember that right now we stand together by staying away from each other. Keep inside, and have your meetings online. The sooner we all follow the new rules, the sooner, it will be over.

In the video below, enjoy the Italian 1990 Eurovision entry Insieme 1992 – it encourages us to stand together in Europe, and that’s what we need right now.

This reflection article is based on the author's ownpersonal experience. Views expressed belongs to him or her, and are to be seen as unrelated to EuroVisionary.com.

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Support EuroVisionary on Patreon.com

Categories: Eurovisionary

18
March
2020

San Marino: Director-General releases statement about Eurovision’s cancellation

San Marino: Director-General releases statement about Eurovision’s cancellation

Carlo Romeo

Moments ago, the director general of the Sanmarinese public broadcaster, Carlo Romeo, issued a statement in regards to the cancellation of the Eurovision Song Contest 2020.

In the statement, Mister Romeo said that in brief SMTRV would like to express its dissatisfaction with the decision to cancel the Eurovision Song Contest 2020. He would have liked it to have been moved to the autumn. Mr. Romeo says that having the song Contest as an opener of the 2020-2021 TV schedule would’ve been an unequivocal message to the society for renovation through music and international co-operation. The DG of the broadcaster also highlights the importance of taking the required security precautions in order for the event to take place.

See alsoCoronavirus: It's official – Eurovision 2020 cancelled

Here is Mr Romeo’s quote:

Quite right – obviously – the decision by Eurovision 2020 to cancel the date of mid-May but as a broadcaster, and I am sure I am not the only one, it would certainly have been more logical not a total cancellation of the event but, as happened for the Europeans, a postponement to autumn 2020 or directly to 2021. It would be the choice of common sense that would avoid predictable aftermath between courts and media with potential class action or single actions by all the parties concerned, not least the artists themselves and Eurovision fans Postponing everything to the end of September or the beginning of October – without prejudice to health security, an absolute priority for all – would also give the possibility to all State radio and television stations to open their 2020-2021 schedules with Eurovision 2020, giving a significant and strong signal of taken up through the international language of music

SMTRV requested the quote be used in the exact wording it was sent out.

San Marino would have been represented by Senhit this year with the song Freaky. She also represented San Marino in 2011.

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