19
May
2019

Australia and the Netherlands won the semi-finals – Poland and Lithuania almost reached the final

Australia and the Netherlands won the semi-finals – Poland and Lithuania almost reached the final

KEiiNO (Norway 2019)

It’s time to crunch the numbers. The full result for the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest has just been revealed, and it shows quite some interesting details regarding the two semi-finals.

As the semi-finalists are announced in random order, it’s not until after the final, we get to know the full result. It’s usually quite interesting reading that reveals not only who was close to reaching the final, but also the difference between jury and televoting.

Contents

  • 1 Grand final
  • 2 Semi-final 1
  • 3 Semi-final 2

Grand final

It’s a discussion that comes up every year; the difference between jury and tele voting. This year we are in the special situation that Sweden won the jury vote while Norway won tele voting – and in the combined result, the Netherlands won with Italy as runner up. The Netherlands themselves scored a third place with the juries and second place with the viewers at home.

The United Kingdom finished last, receiving a total of 16 points, of which only 3 from the viewers at home. Germany scored two places higher but sadly did not receive a single point from the televotes. With those numbers, it’s easy to blame their Big 5 status for the poor results. However, with Italy’s second place there must be more to it.

In Belarus, the entire jury was dismissed after their results were revealed in an interview. Their votes are based on “an aggregated result approved by the auditors”, according to EBU. It seems unclear how these points came about, but it’s interesting to note that their jury gave 8 points to Germany and 5 to the United Kingdom. Without these points, Germany would have swapped position with Belarus and ended on a second to last 25th place.

Semi-final 1

It probably doesn’t come as a surprise to many that Australia won the first semi-final. Most had predicted that outcome, from the semi-final many considered the weakest of the two. Runner up was Czech Republic.

Only two points ahead Belarus managed to qualify for the final instead of Poland. Hungary on the 13th place was a lot further from qualifying with 25 points up to the so-desired spot in the final.

Had this semi been decided based only on televotes, Hatari from Iceland would have won it with 151 points. The jury winner was Lake Malawi from Czech Republic, with 157 points. But neither was backed enough by both the TV viewers and the professional jury to beat Australia.

Semi-final 2

The second semi-final was considered the toughest one of the two. It featured most of the big favourites to win. The full result shows that the Netherlands won this semi-final ahead of North Macedonia.

This time there was only one point difference between being out and being in the final. The 10th place went to Denmark who qualified instead of Lithuania in 11th place. Things weren’t so tight between the 8th and 9th positions, where 61 points separated Malta from Albania.

Just like in the other two shows, the winner of this Semi-Final scored absolute top marks with neither jury or televote. North Macedonia received most jury points (155, and 84 from televote). Norway won the televote with 170 points, while receiving 40 from the juries. Overall winner The Netherlands received 140 points from both.

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Categories: Eurovisionary

18
May
2019

Eurovision 2019: Grand final in photos

Eurovision 2019: Grand final in photos
  • Location Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Photographer Martin Fjellanger
  • Date Fri, 17 May 2019

Icelandic BDSM punk, Swedish gospel, flying Australian pop opera, A Dutch piano playing favourite, Eastern pop and great Balkan ballads. The 2019 Eurovision final has something for everyone. Check out photos from this great show.

  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Interval Act Eurovision 2019 Grand Final
  • Miki (Spain 2019)
  • Miki (Spain 2019)
  • Miki (Spain 2019)
  • Miki (Spain 2019)
  • Miki (Spain 2019)
  • Kate Miller-Heidke (Australia 2019)
  • Kate Miller-Heidke (Australia 2019)
  • Kate Miller-Heidke (Australia 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Luca Hänni (Switzerland 2019)
  • Nevena Božović (Serbia 2019)
  • Nevena Božović (Serbia 2019)
  • Nevena Božović (Serbia 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Mahmood (Italy 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Bilal Hassani (France 2019)
  • Chingiz (Azerbaijan 2019)
  • Chingiz (Azerbaijan 2019)
  • Chingiz (Azerbaijan 2019)
  • Chingiz (Azerbaijan 2019)
  • Chingiz (Azerbaijan 2019)
  • ZENA (Belarus 2019)
  • ZENA (Belarus 2019)
  • Victor Crone (Estonia 2019)
  • Victor Crone (Estonia 2019)
  • Victor Crone (Estonia 2019)
  • Hatari (Iceland 2019)
  • Hatari (Iceland 2019)
  • Hatari (Iceland 2019)
  • Hatari (Iceland 2019)
  • Hatari (Iceland 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • Michael Rice (United Kingdom 2019)
  • KEiiNO (Norway 2019)
  • KEiiNO (Norway 2019)
  • KEiiNO (Norway 2019)
  • KEiiNO (Norway 2019)
  • KEiiNO (Norway 2019)
  • Kobi Marimi (Israel 2019)
  • Kobi Marimi (Israel 2019)
  • Kobi Marimi (Israel 2019)
  • Kobi Marimi (Israel 2019)
  • Katerine Duska (Greece 2019)
  • Katerine Duska (Greece 2019)
  • Katerine Duska (Greece 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Duncan Laurence (Netherlands 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Tamta (Cyprus 2019)
  • Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl (Slovenia 2019)
  • Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl (Slovenia 2019)
  • Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl (Slovenia 2019)
  • Zala Kralj & Gašper Šantl (Slovenia 2019)
  • John Lundvik (Sweden 2019)
  • John Lundvik (Sweden 2019)
  • John Lundvik (Sweden 2019)
  • Tamara Todevska (North Macedonia 2019)
  • Tamara Todevska (North Macedonia 2019)
  • Serhat (San Marino 2019)
  • Serhat (San Marino 2019)
  • Serhat (San Marino 2019)
  • Leonora (Denmark 2019)
  • Leonora (Denmark 2019)
  • Leonora (Denmark 2019)
  • Sergey Lazarev (Russia 2019)
  • Sergey Lazarev (Russia 2019)
  • Sergey Lazarev (Russia 2019)
  • Sergey Lazarev (Russia 2019)
  • Sergey Lazarev (Russia 2019)
  • S!sters (Germany 2019)
  • S!sters (Germany 2019)
  • S!sters (Germany 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Lake Malawi (Czech Republic 2019)
  • Jonida Maliqi (Albania 2019)
  • Jonida Maliqi (Albania 2019)
  • Jonida Maliqi (Albania 2019)
  • Michela (Malta 2019)
  • Michela (Malta 2019)
  • Michela (Malta 2019)
  • Michela (Malta 2019)
  • Michela (Malta 2019)
  • At the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest Grand Final Dress Rehearsal

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Categories: Eurovisionary

18
May
2019

Taking Flight: The Upward Trajectory of Australia At Eurovision 2019

Taking Flight: The Upward Trajectory of Australia At Eurovision 2019

Leading into song 9 at the first-ever ‘Australia Decides’ National Final, there was a sense of anticipation on the entry of indie-darling Kate Miller-Heidke, both from those present in the arena and those on the live television broadcast. Treated to some of the best talent within Australia, including the worldwide known drag queen Courtney Act and current chart-topping Brisbane band Sheppard, the standard was high.  Just as the lights went up, most of the general public gasped in delight at the tall shadowy figure of the ice queen scaling the high notes of her entry ‘Zero Gravity’.

Despite momentum for underground dance group Electric Fields, it seemed that the stars were always meant to shine on Kate – a clear favourite of the production team who were glowing with praise at having such an entry in their selections.  Surrounding her with a series of clips of the high camp and spectacular staging from Eurovision, framed her staging nicely.

Even though it was the clear favourite at Australia Decides, most fans – including myself – were quick to dampen Australian expectations at the much-larger 2019 Eurovision Song Contest. ‘We’ve seen this before, and it’s not won yet’ was the general consensus; from the pop-opera vocal stylings to the large-scale dress.  Comparisons to Elena from Estonia 2018 were abound.  How could Australia, now seemingly going for the big prop novelty stage act, possibly work?

A History of Kate

The pop-era genre is nothing new for performer Kate, who has been performing a mix of contemporary pop, folk and opera since for over a decade. She trained at the Queensland Conservatorium as a classical singer and has performed in the genre with the English National and New York Metropolitan operas.

Her breakthrough in Australia however came in 2009, when she reached the top of the charts and double platinum sales for her hits ‘The Last Day On Earth’ and ‘Caught In The Crowd’.  It was used in countless television soundtracks and enjoyed heavy rotation on local radio.

It has been hard to avoid her presence in the music and arts scene since.  From holding a role as Musical Director at the Australian Performing Rights Association, writing comedy songs for fellow friendly acts at the Adelaide Cabaret Festival, acting on national television and now composing Operas and also the hottest musical in Australia, to a stage adaptation of cult movie ‘Muriels Wedding’, Kate has a lot on her shoulders.

She decided to submit her song for the national selections after being inspired by Nettas’ winning song ‘Toy’ last year, where she recognised that you can produce innovative music and still bring fun to the stage.

A History Of Australia At Eurovision

Australia’s history with Eurovision begins with the launch of broadcaster SBS in 1983.  Largely aimed at the European migrant community, showing the contest allowed those expats to keep their connections to the homeland by watching the event that they both grew up with and to discover new music in their native tongue.

Whilst there were some haphazard attempts to localise the Contest over coming years, we can fast forward to 2009; the year in which the broadcaster decided that with growing interest and audience numbers locally to send a team to present the commentary from on the ground. Australians loved the combination of comedic and highly appreciative views from our own voices and ratings swelled.  The push to compete on the ground was greater than ever, and finally in 2014, the broadcaster was asked to contribute an interval act to explain the unique love and relationship Aussies have with Eurovision.  2015 saw Australia compete for the very first time, with a fifth placing Guy Sebastian, then Dami Im (second in 2016), Isaiah (2017) and Jessica Mauboy (2018).  Think whatever you like about these acts, all achieved qualification to the finals on the Saturday night on talent alone with little diaspora or cultural relationships to rely upon for points.

Whilst SBS carries the Eurovision for broadcast, the logistics are handled in most part by an external group known as Blink TV.  The production company have long and wide-ranging experience in both the television and arts fields, having produced a comedy special for Adam Hills, an concert special of Kylie Minogue’s Homecoming ShowGirl tour, a large number of Australian comedy panel shows and also Junior Eurovision for the other Australian Public Broadcaster ABC-TV.

Christer Bjorkman (l) and Paul Clarke

Christer Bjorkman (l) and Paul Clarke

Head of Delegation for Australia since 2015 has been Paul Clarke, also lead director of Blink TV.  His experience dates back to the 1980s as a journalist and TV presenter, then head of the arts and entertainment on ABC-TV as a writer, producer-director and co-creator of hugely popular music series ‘Recovery’ and ‘Spicks and Specks’ through the 1990s and early 2000s.  Simply put, his experience tends to understand both sides of what is required in regard to the trio of PR story, music and the televisual experience; thus Eurovision is his perfect playground.

Having this team at the helm always guaranteed that Eurovision relationship with Australia would be a serious one, moving away from being the regularly portrayed kitsch-fest that and negative attitude on the Contest was borne of the decades of Terry Wogan commentated broadcasts carried by SBS.

One thing is certain, when Australia joined, they were always going to mean business.

Stone In My Shoe

The Australian team remained focused but somewhat quiet over the promotion period leading up to this years contest.  ‘Significant changes’ were promised for the stage show with the team working hard behind closed doors and were tight-lipped on anything further.

Miller-Heike’s promotions were in the main locally-based TV chat shows that combined mentions of her participation alongside new dates for her musical ‘Muriels Wedding’.  Internationally, she participated in Eurovision In Concert, due to the convenience of her travelling to nearby Israel for the shooting of the dancing postcard.

Further media appearances were suspended on her return from Europe in April due to a highly infected blister caused from the postcard dancing in inappropriate shoes, seeing her spend a week in hospital to recover.  Question marks hung over her health and PR momentum for the show hit a wall, with betting odds for Australia blowing out at a whopping 140/1, the highest for any Australian act performing at Eurovision.

Kate rests up in hospital prior to Eurovision

Nothing Holding Me Down

Ditching the giant blue dress for which she had to scale a ladder to attach to her waist, she is now resplendent in a fairytale white sparkly dress designed by the same team that were responsible for Dami Ims’ unique flowing dress in 2016 that now hangs in the Australian Music Museum in Melbourne as a significant moment in the history of the nation.

The static feel of the national final stage show also went the way of the dodo, replaced with an ambitious choice to replicate and maximise the element that did draw positives from fans – the inclusion of the Strange Fruit circus team on their bendy poles.

It is this component that ultimately now has people across Europe captivated, with viewers kept bewildered by exactly what they are seeing – an overlay image of the world hiding the surprise of the flowing movements of Kate and her two backing bendy pole ‘dementors’ until a minute into the song.  This wonder is also felt within the arena audience, and the moment where she is wheeled onto the stage continues to draw audible gasps from those in attendance.

Kate takes flight (Image: ESC Insight)

Clearly the unique staging has caught a wind of attention in a year where many of the songs have failed to produce as greater sense of wonder, and in turn, momentum at the crucial part of the race to win Eurovision.

Judging by the coverage it has gathered from mainstream, many are excited for the novelty, but then stay for the narrative. ‘Zero Gravity’ is essentially an auto-biographical tale of Kate’s experience of post-natal depression following the birth of her now 3-year old son Ernie. It makes sense that her own partner and long-time collaborator Keir Nuttall then shares the writing credits on the song; telling of their private journey of emerging from a dark place to literally floating on air, throwing off the burdens to achieve a sense of weightlessness.

The staging concept finally makes sense, leading the general public to be left in a sense of wonder in how it can be achieved – along with utmost respect to control the apparatus whilst delivering flawless vocals on all the rehearsals. And there is now a narrative we have seen play out over the past three months which has captivated everyone from the BBC to Ukrainian television for coverage.  All the elements created by the Australian Delegation are working in harmony, and the momentum seemingly is peaking just at the right time.  In the evening before we decide, odds have dropped to as low as 6/1, holding a second favourite status leading into the 2019 Contest final.

Whether it’s enough for a win, we shall see shortly.

Categories: ESC Insight

18
May
2019

Eurovision final soon coming up – time to place your last bets

Eurovision final soon coming up – time to place your last bets

Betting

Odds are so low for Duncan Laurence to win that some bookmakers closed for bets on this. With just a few hours to go, there are however still chance to earn a little bit of extra cash if you dare to gamble on anything else than a Dutch victory.

If you are convinced the Netherlands will win this year’s Eurovision Song Contest you will no longer be able to earn money it. The bookmakers places him with 46% chance of a victory. If you think someone else might take home the trophy, you can however win a few bets. How much of course depends on who you place your hard earned money on.

Winner odds

The biggest amount to earn would be on a German victory. If S!sters are to win the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest, you can currently get as much as up to 500 times back your stake, but let’s be honest, would a sane person place such a bet knowing they would lose their money? This just isn’t going to be Germany’s year, but there are other bets with a higher chance of being able to pay for your next holiday.

Should you place your money on an Estonian win, you need to look carefully before selecting which bookmaker to use. You can find anything between 50/1 and 400/1. If you think Cyprus might exchange last year’s second place to a victory, you can get your money back with an average of 150.

With the Netherlands being such a big favourite there are money to earn on many other potential winners. You can be quite sure that Russia’s Sergey Lazarev will put in everything he can – and that Russia will gain quite a lot of votes from friendly countries around them. Currently you can get your money back up to 35 times, if he wins.

It’s just a few days ago, the bookmakers after Bilal Hassani’s rehearsal took him from 12th to 3rd in the odds to win this year’s contest. After the two semi-finals, he has dropped again and odds now shows 50/1.

Sweden rarely gets it wrong at Eurovision. They have their eyes on the 7th win which will bring them a tie with Ireland as most winning country. In the past five years, their worst result is last year’s 7th place. Their impressive results lately – and the fact that John Lundvik will deliver a perfect performance in the final, does make it one to watch out for. Though he is 4th in the odds, you can get quite decent a payback at 19/1.

Top 10 odds

If you don’t dare to place a bet straight on a winner, there are also other options. Top 10 is quite a lot safer, but naturally with less money to gain. None of the countries tipped in top 10 have odds above 2/1, so to earn a decent amount, you need to look for the ones outside this list.

Could Malta’s Michela make top 10? Odds for her to do so are currently at 3.25/1. If you want an even higher cash back, you might want to consider Denmark for a top 10 result at odds 9/1 or Estonia at 12/1.

Do you prefer to take a bigger chance Serhat representing San Marino is interesting. If he makes top 10, you get your money back 26 times. United Kingdom at 21/1 could be interesting too.

All odds are from Eurovisionworld.

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Categories: Eurovisionary

18
May
2019

Spotter’s Guide: Eurovision 2019 – The Grand Final

Spotter’s Guide: Eurovision 2019 – The Grand Final

A Spectacular Opening

The opening ceremony always sets the tone for the Eurovision final, and this year is no exception. Leaning heavily into Tel Aviv’s reputation as the party capital of Israel, we get Dana International performing her version of Omer Adam’s Ha Habibi Tel Aviv, Nadav Guedj reprising his 2015 anthem Golden Boy, and Israeli national treasure Ilanit singing the country’s first ever Eurovision entry, Ey Sham. Don’t tune in late, this is a real treat for Eurovision fans of all generations.

Returning Stars

The familiar faces don’t end with the opening ceremony – this year’s Contest is packed with cameos from notable Eurovision stars. Izhar Cohen is back to read the Swedish points, Netta debuts her infectious new single Nana Banana, and there’s a spectacular medley in which Conchita, Måns Zelmerlöw, Eleni Foureira, and Verka Serduchka cover each others’ Eurovision hits before joining forces with Gali Atari for a heartwarming run through Israel’s anthemic 1979 winner Hallelujah. It’s quite the spectacle – particular when Eleni somehow manages to out-camp Verka with a seductive interpretation of Dancing Lasha Tumbai that won’t soon be forgotten.

Nadav Guedj finally delivers on his offer to show us Tel Aviv… (Eurovision.tv/Elena Volotova)

A Long, Long Wait for the Votes

As you might have gathered, the interval performances this year are extensive. You might wish to get comfortable once the competitive songs are over, because there’s a fair old while until the results come through. In addition to the aforementioned returning artists, there’s also an ambitious piece from local star Idan Raichel, the return of Israeli ‘mentalist’ Lior Suchard with some more ‘mind-reading’, a video cameo from Gal Gadot, and, of course, the biggest one of all …

Madonna

Yes, the controversial queen of pop has finally confirmed that she’ll be performing in tonight’s show, after weeks of fevered speculation. She’s strictly rehearsing behind closed doors, so we don’t know exactly what her performance is going to look like yet, but we do know that she’s set to sing her latest single Future and her classic 1989 hit Like A Prayer. Love her or loathe her, it’s bound to be a moment.

Madonna will perform a two-song interval set during tonight’s show. (EBU/Steven Klein)

A Change To The Voting

The powers that be at the EBU have once again tampered with the voting system this year, making a small but critical change to the way the final televote is presented. Instead of starting from the song with the lowest televote and working upwards, the points are revealed in the order of their jury score – starting with revealing the televote for the country that finished last with the juries and so on. Having seen the run-through during rehearsals, there’s a slight sense of lost momentum in this system as it’s less clear what the significance of the votes is until the very end. That said, it does clean up the final winner announcement quite nicely, and we’re bound to be on the edge of our seats either way.

A New Winner!

Will the Netherlands justify the fairly consistent faith of the bookies? Will Iceland’s dominance in the media translate into a victory? Could Australia’s spectacular stage show push them over the edge? Or will Switzerland’s party anthem give them the best possible Eurovision comeback after years in the Semi Final doldrums? We genuinely have no idea, and things seem even more open this year than usual – which will hopefully lead to some very exciting results! Whatever happens, enjoy the show and don’t be too downhearted if your favourite doesn’t win. There’s always next year.

Stay tuned to ESC Insight for a thorough post-mortem on the results online and on the ESC Insight podcast. Check out the latest version of the ESC Insight newsletter here, or subscribe here to receive regular updates direct to your inbox. 

For all the latest Eurovision-related news and analysis, you can also follow ESC Insight on Facebook and Twitter. 

Categories: ESC Insight

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